Programs  OFF-SITE

OFF-SITE

Jun 27, 2014 -
Aug 23, 2014

KANEKO | 1111 Jones St
9:00am

Directions/Map

OFF-SITE: Prefabrication and the Home will be on display at KANEKO from June 27–August 23.

An opening reception for this exhibition and Truck-A-Tecture will take place on June 27 from 6–9pm, featuring a special symposium with the exhibition curators at 7pm. This reception is FREE and open to the public. To register, click the “Register Now” button above.

OFF-SITE will offer the public an opportunity to examine close-up contemporary prefab models, interpret and reconsider new building formats, and come away with a new vision for the future of off-site manufacturing. Solutions to current economic and social concerns existing in the housing industry, such as affordability, sustainability, and individual customization, will be explored through emerging technologies and trends.

Curatorial Statement by Jennifer Siegal
“Architecture responds to fluidity and possibility… “
– Jennifer Siegal

The creation of habitats is the mainstay of an architect’s creative language. The evolving needs of society necessitate the evolution of a language synthesizing and incorporating new technologies and advances. One of the purposes of this exhibition is to offer the public an opportunity to examine close-up contemporary prefab models, interpret and reconsider new building formats, and come away with a new vision for the future of off-site manufacturing.

OFF-SITE examines solutions to current economic and social concerns existing in the housing industry, (i.e. affordability, sustainability and individual customization). This exhibition identifies emerging economical technologies and trends, and synthesizes recent advancements in design, manufacturing, materials, processes and systems.

Of course, architects have historically responded to the advent of prefabrication, systems and their flexibility in substantially interesting ways. Le Corbusier’s Domino frame and its corollary free plan was one such formula, establishing the independence of the structural frame from the purported freedom of the plan, (or the programmatic layout)—the tension between the two comprising of some of the most salient underlying tenets of Modern Architecture. So too, Frank Lloyd Wright’s layout of the grid in his Usonian Houses established not so much a prefabricated kit of parts, but rather an established module against which flexibility could be gauged. The mid to late 1940’s launched Konrad Wachsmann and Walter Gropius’s Packaged House, the Lustron Home, the Eames’s Case Study House #8 and Jean Prouve’s Maison Tropicale, all of which exemplified distinctive construction techniques and shifting attitudes toward domestic space.

Today, this desire to create increasing degrees of flexibility and adaptability to a changing environment has shifted the way architects think and design buildings. With constant technological advances, the emergence of new materials and manufacturing technologies has created opportunities in fresh territories. The exploration is not simply limited on the formal and tectonic qualities of ‘virtual’ architecture but focused on the creation of smarter and highly performative environments around these new technologies and materials. The merging of long separated manufacturing and building industries allow the architect to rethink the design process and the performance abilities of these tools. As a result of these new manufacturing options, there are more opportunities for architects to become innovators operating on multiple platforms.

Public gallery hours are Monday–Friday, 9am–5pm and Saturdays, 1–5pm.

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